NICE MAGEC Scoliosis System Consultation Concludes with Support

A few months ago we covered the news that the UK’s healthcare watchdog, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) was consulting on whether to lend its support to a clever device for the treatment of children with scoliosis. Now it seems that what had always looked like compelling arguments in favour of the system, Ellipse Technologies’ MAGEC, have stood up to scrutiny, resulting in NICE giving its approval that the NHS can use it in patients for whom conventional non-invasive solution such as bracing are not adequate.

The MAGEC system comprises implantable metal rods. In that regard they are little different to conventional rod treatment for scoliosis. The novel feature is that these rods can be adjusted without the need for what can often be a series of repeat surgical procedures. The treating physician uses a magnetic controller, placed over the implanted device, to impart adjustments to it every few months or as necessary.

The benefits of avoiding surgical intervention are primarily that the patient does not have to endure an operation. With that comes the avoidance of complications that are always a possibility with any form of surgery. And with all of that comes less cost, NICE concluding that the saving per patient could be as much as £12000 ($18000) when compared with conventional rod treatment.

NICE comments about MAGEC Scoliosis Treatment

For NICE, its Director of Health Technology Evaluation,  Professor Carole Longson, said; “We are delighted to publish this guidance which can help make a real difference to children who need surgery for a curved spine. The NICE guidance advises that the MAGEC system can benefit these children with scoliosis, and save the NHS money.”

What the announcement means is that the NHS, in the form of its hospitals and specialists, will be actively encouraged to adopt this system into practice for appropriate scoliosis patients.

You can read more about the announcement here.

 

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